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New Report – Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA)

Did you know?

  • 5% of ‘Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA) participants rated their overall settlement experience as ‘very good’ or ‘good’ shortly after arrival (at wave 1)
  • Factors assisting settlement were feeling safe, children being happy, having had family in Australia and feeling welcome by the community
  • Overall, barriers to using government services decreased over time but language remains the greatest barrier
  • At wave 3, most (60.7%) always felt welcome in Australia. Another 26.5 per cent felt welcome most of the time
  • BNLA participants have become more self-sufficient overtime

These are findings from the inaugural BNLA report The Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA): The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants, Findings from the First Three Waves which was released at the SCOA Symposium in Canberra on 27 November 2017 and which is now available.

As many SCOA members may be aware, the BNLA study follows the settlement of 1,509 humanitarian migrant families and individuals who arrived in Australia in 2013.

The study looks at how participants are settling into life in Australia and aims to increase the knowledge around the factors that support successful settlement and those that hinder it. Many topics are covered including English language outcomes, education, employment, health, housing, self-sufficiency, and children and youth.

The report provides service providers, researchers, policy makers and others with an easy reference to some early findings from the first three waves of the study.

Download the report here

Link to the report: https://www.dss.gov.au/settlement-and-multicultural-affairs/publications/building-a-new-life-in-australia-bnla-the-longitudinal-study-of-humanitarian-migrants

Access to the first three waves of data (on application): https://www.dss.gov.au/our-responsibilities/families-and-children/programmes-services/building-a-new-life-in-australia-bnla-the-longitudinal-study-of-humanitarian-migrants